Monday, March 13, 2017

SHADOWS ON THE TRAIL - Fair to Midland




Figure One - Reconstruction of the SHADOWS ON THE TRAIL scenario below,
although in the drawing above there are two caribou bulls not a bull and a cow elk. 
Two majestic elk, a young bull and a cow, walked out from behind the trees, heading straight at Chayton. The bull led the way while the cow followed behind. The elk held their heads high and sniffed at the air, smelling for any danger that would set them off running. The elk, upwind from Chayton, did not pick up his scent and kept walking towards him.

Chayton’s left throwing arm was cocked and ready to throw the first spear, but the bull was still walking straight at him. Chayton did not like his chances for a kill with this throw. The bull had no vital organs exposed to Chayton’s line of fire and unless Chayton threw perfectly
Figure Two -  CLICK for MORE information
and severed an artery, the elk would not go down. The last thing Chayton wanted to do was track a wounded elk in this rugged country.

Chayton needed the elk to turn and expose its side to his spear. Chayton thought about moving, but one sound and he would send the elk crashing through the trees in the opposite direction. The elk continued to walk straight towards Chayton. Any closer and they would pick up Chayton’s scent.

Chayton searched the ground with his right hand and found a small rock. While his left arm kept his spear ready to throw, he hurled the rock to his right where it ricocheted off a tree. The bull reared back and ran away from the sound, exposing the left side to Chayton's spear. Chayton hurled the spear and the sharp fluted spear point popped when it penetrated the bull’s rib cage. The bull continued to run to the left while Chayton readied another spear. The confused cow ran away from Chayton, crashing through the trees that led back up the bluff. Chayton grabbed the rest of his spears and followed the blood spoor left by the bull.



I took the above hunting scene from my prehistoric thriller book entitled SHADOWS ON THE TRAIL. A young hunter named Chayton from the Folsom People just stalked and harvested a bull elk. I imagine food was always on the minds of the Folsom People some 10,700 years ago. When Chayton's spear smashed into the rib cage of the bull elk, I imagine the fragile stone projectile point might have been damaged. 



Figure Three - 1.8 inch long Midland dart point, exhibiting
a damaged and repaired tip from an impact fracture.  
I love finding and doing autopsies on damaged prehistoric artifacts and coming up with what I believe was the artifact’s history. Please do not get me wrong, I love finding perfect prehistoric artifacts, but the damaged prehistoric artifacts probably have a much more interesting story to tell.
Readers can see both sides of a tip damaged Midland dart / spear point in Figures Three and Four, surface recovered in Texas and made around the same time that Chayton was harvesting his bull elk above, sometime around 10,700 years ago. In fact, perhaps, Chayton used this Midland point and ultimately lost it. ;).  


Midland projectile points were made flat and resembled Folsom points without the fluting. Collectors and archaeologists often find Midland points associated with Folsom points, leading some analysts to believe that Midland points were just unfluted Folsom points. There are some people, however, that believe that Midland artifacts deserve their own cultural designation. Midland projectile points fall within the age range of the Folsom Complex, at around 10,900 to 10,200 years old.   

Figure Four - Side B of Midland dart point,
showing other side of repaired tip.    
Ronny Walker surface rescued this 1.8 inch long Midland dart point in a cotton field in Lynn County, Texas. This root-beer colored, semi-translucent Midland point is very thin. The Paleoindian who made this projectile point ground and polished the edges right up to its new tip (see where angle changes). Paleoindians ground and polished the edges of their projectile point to ensure the razor sharp rock did not slice through and damage the animal sinew they used to bind the projectile point onto the spear or dart fore shaft.
Figure Five - Impact fracture and
repaired tip. Ripples radiate in
same direction as impact occurred.  






This Texas Midland dart point saw hunting action. A bone or a rock or something hard shattered the original tip and one edge, leaving a tiny amount of rock peeking out above the sinew hafting of the dart / spear. Although the Paleoindian hunter did not have much rock left to work with, he beveled a new tip on the broken projectile point along the shattering edges of the impact fracture. The salvaged tip would have been extremely short with just the tip above the sinew hafting.   





Before this artifact resided in my collection, it resided in the Ronny Walker, Tim Elkins, Ed Rowe, Ron Van Heukelom, and Rodney Michel Collections. Dwain Rogers, Bill Jackson, Rodney Michel, and I certified this projectile point as an authentic Midland dart point.  John Branney Collection.
Figure Six - Maker of this projectile point ground the edges
smooth so when hafted on a spear, the animal sinew would
not be cut by sharp rock. This entire edge was probably hafted.


CLICK LINK for more SHADOWS ON THE TRAIL TRILOGY